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Features
Page 60 to Page 75 of Your Screenplay XI
By Don Vasicek
November, 2006, 09:00

The only thing your main character should have left is her will to win.
I
n this screenplay educational series IN will be covering the following course sections of information graciously provided by Donald L. Vasicek:

  • So, You Have A Movie Idea - I
  • More on Your Movie Idea II
  • Emotion and Your Movie Idea III
  • The Logline IV
  • The First Minute V
  • Write The End To Your Screenplay Foremost VI
  • The First Twelve Pages of Your Screenplay VII
  • Page 12 to Page 30 of Your Screenplay VIII
  • Page 30 to Page 45 of Your Screenplay IX
  • Page 45 to Page 60 of Your Screenplay X
  • Page 60 to Page 75 of Your Screenplay XI
  • Page 90 to the End of Your Screenplay XII

Don't miss out on a single issue of IN and how to get your screenplay from the page to the silver screen.


At about Page 60 of your screenplay, the only thing your main character should have left is his/her will to win, to achieve his/her goal. You should've set up this goal early in your screenplay, around Page 10, when you introduced the dramatic premise of your story. Now, with your main character battered and beaten by your villain (who represents evil) or antagonist (simply opposes your main character's goal), you must move your main character forward through the story.

You do this for the next fifteen pages by showing your main character defeating every obstacle that you put in his/her path. In the Academy Award-winning movie, Gone With The Wind, Scarlet O'Hara, having lost her beloved Tara (her land and home) to Union soldiers in the United States Civil War, starving with her father, who has been driven insane, pulls a carrot out of the charred ground of Tara. She waves it in the air and says "As God is my witness, I'll never go hungry again".

From this point on, Scarlet begins cleaning up Tara, planting vegetables, learning how to earn money to rebuild her lost fortune, etc. For the next fifteen minutes of the movie, Scarlet shows her will to win, and to accomplish her goal, which is to live on her beloved Tara. Regardless of what you have your main character doing, from Page 60 to Page 75 of your screenplay, you must show your character "winning" in all that he/she is doing.

By showing your character coming back from total defeat, you will be foreshadowing how strong your main character must be in the coming pages of your screenplay. The obstacles that you must put up in front of your main character after Page 75 must be even more challenging than what you've put your main character through to this point in time.

We'll get into that next time in Page 75 to Page 90 of your screenplay.

Thank you for dropping by.
Good writing to you!
Part XI of XII
Previous part of the series.

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Donald L. Vasicek was a writer/consultant for Warriors of Virtue, screenwriter for The Crown, writer/associate producer for The Lost Heart and Born To Kill. He wrote, directed, and produced Faces, Oh, The Places You Can Go..., Haunted World and the award-winning The Sand Creek Massacre. He writes columns for Hollywood Lit. Sales, Moondance Int'l Film Festival's E-zine, Screenplace, Screenwriters Forum, Screenplayers.Net, Screenwriters Utopia, Ink-On–The-Brain and Spraka & Kinsla (Swedish). Author of How To Write, Sell, And Get Your Screenplays Produced (http://www.selfhelpguides.com/display.php3?guide=1822020729) and The Write Focus. Web site: http://www.donvasicek.com



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