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Features
So, You Have A Movie Idea - I
By Don Vasicek
October, 2005, 19:39

Hollywood demands that you write movies that will make them millions of dollars.
I
n this screenplay educational series IN will be covering the following course sections of information graciously provided by Donald L. Vasicek:

  • So, You Have A Movie Idea - I
  • More on Your Movie Idea II
  • Emotion and Your Movie Idea III
  • The Logline IV
  • The First Minute V
  • Write The End To Your Screenplay Foremost VI
  • The First Twelve Pages of Your Screenplay VII
  • Page 12 to Page 30 of Your Screenplay VIII
  • Page 30 to Page 45 of Your Screenplay IX
  • Page 45 to Page 60 of Your Screenplay X
  • Page 60 to Page 75 of Your Screenplay XI
  • Page 90 to the End of Your Screenplay XII

Don't miss out on a single issue of IN and how to get your screenplay from the page to the silver screen.


The light popped on when you least expected it. You have a great idea for a movie. Hmm, where to go from there?

Well, the first thing to do is look at the genres that fit your idea. Thrillers. Dramas. Comedies. Action/Adventure. Romantic Comedies. Animation. Read the synopses about them. See what you find that fits your idea. If you find several movies that are similar to your idea, then you should think about how fresh your idea is compared to them.

Is it unique? What kind of twist does it have that is different than what you found that parallel your idea? If you are stumped, it's likely your should cremate your movie idea, and get back to your daily life.

If, however, you're unable to find any movies that are similar to your story idea, then think about what kind of audience would want to see your movie. Adults? Kids? Families? Teens? Guys who wear long overcoats?

Once you determine your audience, then, you have a chance to do something more with your idea. This is the first defining moment regarding your idea for a movie. It can save you a lifetime of agony and pain. As a screenwriter, you must fix the limits of your audience. This is what Hollywood is all about. Unless you know who will come to your movie, you will be writing in the dark, and you don't want to do that unless you don't care if your screenplay goes anywhere.

Knowing who your audience will be before you begin writing helps you determine how popular the movie will be even before you write it. And Hollywood demands that you write movies that will make them millions of dollars. So, think about that before you run down the street going nuts because you have a great idea for movie.

Come back next month. We'll take a little trip down the road to what you should do next with your movie idea.

Thank you for dropping by. We'll continue this discussion in our next issue of IN.
Good writing to you!
Part I of XII

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Donald L. Vasicek was a writer/consultant for Warriors of Virtue, screenwriter for The Crown, writer/associate producer for The Lost Heart and Born To Kill. He wrote, directed, and produced Faces, Oh, The Places You Can Go..., Haunted World and the award-winning The Sand Creek Massacre. He writes columns for Hollywood Lit. Sales, Moondance Int'l Film Festival's E-zine, Screenplace, Screenwriters Forum, Screenplayers.Net, Screenwriters Utopia, Ink-On–The-Brain and Spraka & Kinsla (Swedish). Author of How To Write, Sell, And Get Your Screenplays Produced (http://www.selfhelpguides.com/display.php3?guide=1822020729) and The Write Focus. Web site: http://www.donvasicek.com



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